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versions-of-us

Versions of Us by Laura Barnett

What if you had said yes ...? Eva and Jim are nineteen, and students at Cambridge, when their paths first cross in 1958. Jim is walking along a lane when a woman approaching him on a bicycle swerves to avoid a dog. What happens next will determine the rest of their lives. We follow three different versions of their future - together, and apart - as their love story takes on different incarnations and twists and turns to the conclusion in the present day. The Versions of Us is an outstanding debut novel about the choices we make and the different paths that our lives might follow. What if one small decision could change the rest of your life?

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molly-keane

Molly Keane A Life by Sally Phipps

Molly Keane (1904 - 96) was an Irish novelist and playwright (born in County Kildare) most famous for Good Behaviour which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Hailed as the Irish Nancy Mitford in her day; as well as writing books she was the leading playwright of the '30s, her work directed by John Gielgud. Between 1928 and 1956, she wrote eleven novels, and some of her earlier plays, under the pseudonym M.J. Farrell. In 1981, aged seventy, she published Good Behaviour under her own name. The manuscript, which had languished in a drawer for many years, was lent to a visitor, the actress Peggy Ashcroft, who encouraged Keane to publish it. Molly Keane's novels reflect the world she inhabited; she was from a 'rather serious hunting and fishing, church-going family'. She was educated, as was the custom in Anglo-Irish households, by a series of governesses and then at boarding school. Distant and awkward relationships between children and their parents would prove to be a recurring theme for Keane. Maggie O'Farrell wrote that 'she writes better than anyone else about the mother-daughter relationship, in all its thorny, fraught, inescapable complexity.'Here, for the first time, is her biography and, written by one of her two daughters, it provides an honest portrait of a fascinating, complicated woman who was a brilliant writer and a portrait of the Anglo-Irish world of the first half of the twentieth century.

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gentleman-in-moscow

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

This is New York Times Bestseller. "Winning...gorgeous...satisfying...Towles is a craftsman." (New York Times Book Review). "A work of great charm, intelligence and insight." (Sunday Times). "Abundant in humour, history and humanity." (Sunday Telegraph). On 21 June, 1922, Count Alexander Rostov - recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt - is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the Count has been sentenced to house arrest indefinitely. While Russia undergoes decades of tumultuous upheaval, the Count, stripped of the trappings that defined his life, is forced to question what makes us who we are. And with the assistance of a glamorous actress, a cantankerous chef and a very serious child, Rostov unexpectedly discovers a new understanding of both pleasure and purpose.

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Indoor Edible Garden by Zia Allaway

Want to grow your own, but have no garden? Indoor Edible Garden shows you how to grow crops that look good and taste better - all in your own home. Discover healthy and handy indoor garden projects from a Chilli and Herb Hanging Basket to a space-saving Salad Leaf Tapestry. Grow everything from lemons and limes to tomatoes and tamarillos all year round. Make the most of your indoor space and turn windowsills, worktops, walls, balconies, and even ceilings into stunning and delicious indoor gardens. Indoor Edible Garden is packed with all the knowledge you need to understand which plant varieties thrive in the home, how to maximise your light and space, and how to enjoy harvesting and eating fresh fruit, vegetables, and herbs no matter how much - or little - space you have.

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my-sisters-bones

My Sister’s Bones by Nuala Ellwood

'This formidable debut thriller rivals THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN as a compulsive read' Observer THE PSYCHO-THRILLER REVIEWERS ARE CALLING 'SHOCKING' 'RIVETING' AND 'EXPLOSIVE' Kate Rafter is a high-flying war reporter. She's the strong one. The one who escaped Herne Bay and their father. Her sister Sally didn't. Instead, she drinks. But when their mother dies, Kate is forced to return to the old family home. And on her first night she is woken by a terrifying scream. What secret has Kate stumbled upon? And is she strong enough to uncover the truth ...and make it out alive? 'Memorable, jaw-dropping ...harrowing fiction that skilfully draws parallels between the effects of civil war and domestic violence' Sunday Times 'Well-written ...an elegant, punchy thriller with a dark heart' Observer Thriller of the Month 'An exciting, shocking, fast-paced read ...a clever, compelling tale full of surprises' Daily Express 'For lovers of The Girl on the Train ...a tense story with multiple twists and turns' Prima 'Compelling ...Brimful of tension, twists and darkness, this one grabbed me on the first page and didn't let go' Woman and Home 'Compelling and intriguing, right from the very first page' Sharon Bolton 'A gripping rollercoaster ride of a thriller' Christobel Kent, author of The Loving Husband 'Twists and turns until the last page' Tammy Cohen 'A stunning book. Compelling, unsettling and powerful this is a book that will stay with me for a long time.' C.

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Days Without End by Sebastian Barry

WINNER OF 2016 COSTA BOOK OF THE YEAR. "Pitch-perfect, the outstanding novel of the year so far." (Robert McCrum, Observer). "More wrenching and beautiful than anything I've read in a long time." (Aravind Adiga, Guardian Books of the Year). After signing up for the US army in the 1850s, barely seventeen, Thomas McNulty and his brother-in-arms, John Cole, fight in the Indian Wars and the Civil War. Having both fled terrible hardships, their days are now vivid and filled with wonder, despite the horrors they both see and are complicit in. But when a young Indian girl crosses their path, Thomas and John must decide on the best way of life for them all in the face of dangerous odds.

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patrick-and-the-president

Patrick and the President by Ryan Tubridy

A captivating story which beautifully evokes a seminal moment in the life of JFK through the eyes of a young boy. From foremost radio and television broadcaster, Ryan Tubridy, and Kate Greenaway Medal-winner P. J. Lynch, comes a picture book about President John F. Kennedy's return to his ancestral home in Ireland. When the much-loved President visited Ireland in 1963, he described it as the best four days of his life and, for a generation of Irish people, it was a trip they never forgot. In this warmly told, big-hearted picture book, Ryan captures the fevered excitement in the build-up to JFK's visit - all evoked through the eyes of a young boy called Patrick who wants to know, more than anything, what it would feel like to shake the President's hand...Rooted in historical fact, and marking the centenary of JFK's birth, this feast of a book offers readers a very pure and personal take on JFK's visit to County Wexford and includes a bibliography in the back matter.

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ireland-from-the-air

Ireland from the air. Independent Archives.

Before Aer Lingus made its first transatlantic flight, in a time when few Irish people could dream of taking to the air, intrepid aviator Alexander 'Monkey' Campbell Morgan (1919-1958) roamed Ireland's skies, documenting towns and villages throughout the thirty-two counties. A wartime pilot for the Royal Artillery Air Corps, he launched a peacetime career in aerial photography before his tragic death in a plane crash after flying from Shannon.Gathered here are over 250 of his evocative images of Ireland on the cusp of economic and social transformation. Although the pattern of the streets is familiar, the details are radically different: a farmhouse sits in fields where an industrial estate sprawls today; a steamship chugs up the Liffey. Some of the nostalgic photos capture events such as the St Patrick's Day Parade in Dublin, or race week in Tralee.This collection, recently recovered from the archives of the Irish Independent, is complemented by the original captions. It forms a portrait of the Ireland that existed before Teilifis Eireann, Vatican II or the European Economic Community, giving an insight into how the landscape and infrastructure of the nation have evolved.

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Irelands Wild Atlantic Way by Carsten Krieger

Take a photographic journey down Ireland's Atlantic coast from Donegal in the north to Cork in the south. This beautiful book showcases the west coast in all its wild beauty: dramatic views, abundant nature and wildlife, lighthouses, harbours and quaint seaside villages, as well as heritage, history and people. The Wild Atlantic Way is a fully-signposted route along the west coast of Ireland that brings the visitor to some of Ireland's most spectacular scenery and liveliest towns: from surfing in Rossknowlagh to birdwatching at the magnificent cliffs of Moher, from the boats in Galway Bay to traditional music in Doolin, from dolphins in Kerry to castles in Cork there's something for everyone on the wild west coast. Over 200 wonderful photographs. Maps showing each section of the Wild Atlantic Way: Donegal-Mayo, Mayo-Clare, Clare-Kerry, Kerry to Cork. 'a sumptuous book in which the magnificent colour photographs speak for themselves' Books Ireland on Ireland's Coast

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strumpet-city

Strumpet City by James Plunkett

This new edition of the epic Strumpet City marks the centenary of the 1913 Lockout. It has been chosen as Dublin City Libraries' One City, One Book for 2013. First published in 1969, it has repeatedly been described as one of the greatest Irish novels of all time. Centring on the seminal lockout of 20,000 workers in Dublin in 1913, Strumpet City encompasses a wide sweep of city life. From the destitution of Rashers Tierney to the solid, aspirant respectability of Fitz and Mary, the priestly life of Father O'Connor, and the upper-class world of Yearling and the Bradshaws, it paints a portrait of a city of stark contrasts, with an urban working class mired in vicious poverty. Strumpet City is much more than a book about the Lockout. Through the power of vivid fiction we encounter all the complexities of humanity. The brilliant and much-loved TV series, originally screened by RTE in 1980, is fondly remembered by many but to read the book is to immerse yourself in social and historical writing akin to Chekhov and Tolstoy. Strumpet City is the great, sweeping Irish historical novel of the 20th century.

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hearts-invisible-furies

The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

Cyril Avery is not a real Avery or at least that's what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn't a real Avery, then who is he? Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead. At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from - and over his three score years and ten, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country and much more. In this, Boyne's most transcendent work to date, we are shown the story of Ireland from the 1940s to today through the eyes of one ordinary man. The Heart's Invisible Furies is a novel to make you laugh and cry while reminding us all of the redemptive power of the human spirit.

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orange-blossom-days

orange blossom days by Patricia Scanlan

In a beautiful southern Spanish town, where the sea sparkles and orange blossoms scent the air, the gates of a brand new apartment complex, La Joya de Andalucia, glide open to welcome the new owners. Anna and Austen MacDonald, an Irish couple, are preparing to enjoy their retirement to the full. But the demands of family cause problems they have never foreseen and shake their marriage to the core. Sally-Ann Connolly Cooper, a feisty Texan mother of two young teenagers, is reeling from her husband's infidelity. La Joya becomes a place of solace for Sally-Ann, in more ways than one. Eduardo Sanchez, a haughty Madrileno, has set out with single-minded determination to become El Presidente of the complex's management committee. But pride comes before a fall. Jutta Sauer Perez, a sophisticated German who aspires to own her very own apartment in La Joya, works hard to reach her goal. Then the unthinkable happens.

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